Helping Kids to Just be Kids:


    The Roberts Proton Therapy Center is one of only six facilities with proton radiation technology in the world. Because of this, children who could benefit from this specialized treatment are often forced to relocate for extended periods of time to receive treatment. Any parent's primary goal is making sure their children are healthy and safe. When combined with the cost of treatment and travel, finding ways to have fun can fall lower on the priority list. As someone who went through this treatment at thirteen years old, I can say that having fun is one thing that should never be stripped from a child. Because my family lived only an hour from Philadelphia, I was able to take the train to and from treatment everyday. This was invaluable because it allowed me to sleep in my own bed and remain close with family and friends. Additionally, my parents prioritized having fun and making my treatment more of an adventure than a chore. We would frequently go to the zoo, the aquarium, a sporting event or museums before or after treatment.


    Many organizations focus on raising money to donate to research towards a cure. These initiatives are wonderful and very much needed, but I am looking to do something different with my efforts. The Carter N. Bowman Foundation is focused on providing kids and their families the opportunity to enjoy activities, at no cost to them, while undergoing extended cancer treatments away from home. The real goal is to give kids the chance to take a break from the grueling routine of treatments and provide stress-free ways to let them just be kids. Patients and their family receive free tickets to the zoo, aquarium, a museum or art gallery.

How to Help:

Make a general donation or sponsor a specific activity that will help someone to just be a kid for a day. Visit the DONATE page for more information.

Mission Statement:

    To provide stress-free and enjoyable opportunities to children and teen cancer patients, and their families, during the many weeks they undergo proton radiation treatments at the University of Pennsylvania Robert's Proton Therapy Center.